Culture  Trans-Inclusive Media Recommendations

With Transgender Awareness Week taking place from November 13-19 and Transgender Day of Remembrance on November 20, the Daily and the Union for Gender Empowerment wanted to highlight media by, for, and about trans people. This list is just some of the incredible content that exists.

Books

Pansy by Andrea Gibson
Pansy is a 2015 poetry collection by Andrea Gibson in which they touch on themes such as love, gender, politics, family, and illness. Gibson refers to the book as both a “rally cry for political action” and a “celebration and longing and love.” One poem, “A Letter to White Queers, A Letter to Myself,” discusses the importance of white members of the LGBTQ+ community participating in active allyship for their racialized peers.

I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya
A repeat from the Daily’s Book Recommendations (it’s just that good), this 2018 creative nonfiction piece tackles gender and how we view femininity and masculinity. I’m Afraid of Men perfectly articulates those feelings of not “doing” gender in a way that cis people approve of and the frustrations that come with it. It’ll hurt, make you uncomfortable, and make you go “ah, someone finally gets it,” all in one sitting.

Music

Dorian Electra
Basically the coolest person in the music scene, Dorian Electra is a genderfluid popstar who is known for their catchy songs and extravagant music videos, including “Flamboyant” and “Man to Man.” They have spoken out about the restrictions of the gender binary, saying “the core of my being is not gendered at all – even ‘genderfluid’ is a form of identity that can put somebody in a box.”

Mary Wander
Mary Wander describes themself on their Bandcamp page as “a queer, non-binary, 25-year-old, anarchist folk punk musician [ who] sings about their life; missing their lover, recovery from drug-use, relationships with family, going on dates in the Trump-regime, being in a gendered body in a gendered world, and breakfast.” Their song “Gender Ender” discusses misgendering, companionship, and romance.

YouTube

Ash Hardell
Ash Hardell is a non-binary YouTuber who vlogs about gender and sexuality. Some of their best videos include “It’s (NOT) Just a Phase” (a video about the experiences of older non-binary folks), “Leaky Nipples and Nerve Damage” (a guide to taking care of top surgery scars), and “Trans Sex Ed” (which discusses having comfortable and enjoyable sex with dysphoria). They have also published a book called The GayBC’s of LGBTQ+, which provides education on LGBTQ+ identities and has become a widely used resource in schools.

Riley J. Dennis
Riley J. Dennis is a trans YouTuber who makes videos about politics, media representation of queer individuals, travel, and sexuality. Some of their best videos about trans experiences are “Tumblr’s Porn Ban is Somehow Worse Than You Think,” “Queer Women Websites That Support Trans Women,” and “The Singular Gender-Neutral Pronoun You Already Use.” Their videos provide an accessible and entertaining platform to learn about anti-oppression.

Podcasts

From the Margins
McGill Social Work student, community organizer, activist, and educator Vincent Mousseau hosts From the Margins, a podcast which they describe by saying “as a Black, queer and trans person, social justice is more than just theory for me: it plays into every aspect of my life and how I move through the world. Unfortunately, intersectional perspectives are often not at the center of the conversations, leaving stories like mine at the margins.” Episode topics include understanding intersectionality and making health and social services trans-inclusive.

Gender Blender
This podcast, which is hosted and produced by Tai Jacob (a former Daily writer!), features “trans, Two Spirit, nonbinary, and (a)gender creative folks exploring the multiple ways that we relate to gender, our bodies, social movements, and community spaces.” Episode topics include intersex experiences with the medical system and Chicago’s Trans Liberation Collective.

Queer Sex Ed
Queer Sex Ed is a podcast that aims “to share the stories of […] sexual health, sex positivity, and everyday queer sexual life to normalize authentic conversations about sex, pleasure, boundaries, health, and communication.” In an education system where sexual education relies on cisgender and straight narratives, this podcast is a breath of fresh air.