Commentary | A woman’s body

I have a woman’s body. My woman’s body comes with breasts and a penis. It didn’t used to have breasts. It was still a woman’s body. One day it will have a vulva and a vagina. But it’s already a woman’s body.

Often I’m told that I don’t have a woman’s body, that I have a man’s body. That a woman’s body has a vulva and a vagina. I don’t see why. Ain’t I a woman? If I am a woman, wouldn’t my body be a woman’s body? It seems logical.

How do we decide what is a woman’s body? I figure that you put together all women, look at the body they have in common, and call it a women’s body.

If we have a group of cubes, two hundred are red and one is blue, would we say that the colour of the cubes is red? We would say that the colour of the cubes is typically red, but sometimes blue. If we say that cubes are red, we’ll be accused of forgetting the blue cube. It’s child’s play.

When we say that a woman’s body has breasts, a vulva, and a vagina, we’re saying that trans women aren’t counted. We say that, at the time of deciding what a woman’s body is, we excluded trans women from the count. What we’re saying is that trans women are from the very beginning refused as women. To say that a trans woman has a man’s body is to say that we don’t consider her to really be a woman.

Yet, I am a woman. I should be counted, as much as any red cube. It’s as simple as saying that women’s bodies usually have breasts, a vulva, and a vagina, but sometimes not. Sometimes they don’t have breasts. Sometimes they have a penis. Women’s bodies come as varied as the women that inhabit them.

I have a woman’s body. My woman’s body comes with breasts and a penis. It’s no less a woman’s body.


Comments posted on The McGill Daily's website must abide by our comments policy.
A change in our comments policy was enacted on January 23, 2017, closing the comments section of non-editorial posts. Find out more about this change here.