Culture | Make-up cover-up

Ever heard of Ahava? It’s a cosmetics company that specializes in skin care products. Cosmetics companies often stir up enough controversy on their own, through questionable ad campaigns and poisonous ingredients not declared on their bottles. But that isn’t the kind of controversy that you’d expect Tadamon!, the Montreal diaspora solidarity group, to engage in. Nevertheless, Ahava has raised Tadamon!’s ire because of the controversial origins of their products. Ahava proudly advertises their use of Dead Sea salt – salt, Tadamon! says, extracted on illegally occupied West Bank lands. Ahava’s being sold at the Bay these days, and for Halloween, Tadamon! is throwing either the most fun protest, or the most political party you’ve ever been to, depending on how you look at it. In collaboration with the Quebec Boycott Divestment and Sanctions Committee (BDS), Tadamon is hosting a costume party outside the Bay at 12:30 p.m. on Halloween to launch their Boycott Ahava campaign. Ahava’s committed a double sin in the eyes of Tadamon! – not only do they extract their salt on the West Bank coastline, their products are actually manufactured on West Bank settlements deemed illegal by the UN. Regardless of your politics, this might be the only chance you’re going to get to see “zombies of apartheid” or “war crimes mud monsters” walking around Ste. Catherine.


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